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Could the UK Healthcare system survive without EU Nurses and Carers?

by EasternEuropeans.co.uk
Could the UK Healthcare system survive without EU Nurses and Carers?

In 2004 European Parliament and the Council Directives made certain provisions for Eastern European countries  from the A8  to join the EU. The Freedom of Movement act allows all EU citizens the right to live and work in any other part of Europe. What has this meant for the United Kingdom is that people from other parts of Europe with skills needed in the UK can come here freely. Part of this influx has been EU Nurses and EU Care Workers who can work in the UK and provide quality labour skills. And for the most part this has been a positive experience. But this directive has been a source of much controversy among the British public. It has been seen as a negative influence on the public services with many of them being free or publicly funded. Some  British people might see it as a burden on those public services. In fact only 4% of the JSA claimants in the UK are not British born. The fact remains that the migrants are coming to work, they are coming to pay tax and contribute to the United Kingdom. Public services such as the National Health Service have particularly come under scrutiny. But let's look at this from another point of view. What about the thousands of migrants actually working for the NHS? The EU Nurses that make up the bricks and mortar of the NHS healthcare system.

 

Many people will argue that these jobs could be taken by British nationals. But surely if those jobs were open in the first place it has been proven that British nationals don’t want them or are simply not qualified to fill them. The plain simple fact is, these jobs were empty and waiting to be filled. And EU citizens are trained and willing to fill them. Let's look at two case studies to verify these findings about EU Care workers.

 

Maria from Spain is a fully trained phlebotomy nurse. She is 25 years old, is single and has trained at the Universidad Europea Madrid as a phlebotomy technician. She is therefore qualified to drain blood and study blood for all known diseases and parasites. Actually one of the core services of the NHS. Nearly every medical reason for visiting the hospital or clinic requires the giving of blood. It is a fundamental part of medical admission. But there are a major shortage of phlebotomy nurses in the UK. Because a lot of UK medical students see it as a basic qualification and they want to study other aspects of the nursing industry. So Maria has the European Parliaments permission as an EU resident. To come and live in the UK and also work. So it makes perfect sense to employ a personally legally able to take the job such as Maria. The counter arguments are from this point onward, pointless.

 

Another example would be Romanian born Adam, 30 from Bucharest. He graduated with top honours in Radiology from Cluj Napoca Medical University. He has studied specifically to come and work in the UK. Since the radiologist salary in Romania is not as good as he could get in the UK. There was an opening at Heartlands Hospital Birmingham. One of the largest hospitals in the area for an assistant radiologist with the view to progression. He is perfectly within his rights as an EU citizen to apply. And since the hospital board were not that impressed with the UK applicants. He was given the job.

 

These are just two examples of qualified EU medical staff seeking work and actually supporting the NHS. EU Nurses and EU Care Workers have been bolstering the NHS since its birth. The NHS has an total migrant support network of staff some 85,000 strong. And at least half of those come from the EU. In fact recent estimates concluded that a very conservative estimate would suggest that 37% of all NHS doctors qualified abroad. Of course not all of these are EU born. But these figures clearly suggest that EU Nurses taking jobs with the NHS isn't merely a matter of “taking our jobs”. It is clearly a widespread need that is being filled by competent and let us not forget qualified staff.  With the cost of UK universities and UK based study rising. EU member states are able to deliver the same high quality training afforded by UK medical schools, at a fraction of the cost.

 

So therefore it makes sense that EU nationals are becoming qualified much quicker and at far less cost than British institutions are capable of delivering. See a need, fill a need.

 

In fact if we look at the broader picture. There is a worldwide shortage of healthcare providers. From Nurses and Care Home Workers to Surgeons, so therefore the question proposed at the beginning. Could the UK healthcare survive without EU healthcare workers? The answer we must conclude is, no it couldn’t. The same way that other  healthcare systems in countries such as Germany cannot survive without other EU Nurses , EU Care workers and Care Home Workers from other parts of Europe. The NHS need EU Nurses. It simply cannot sustain the sheer quantity of healthcare needed to be given without them.



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Article of the Day
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Other articles:
- Possible Consequences of Brexit on Care Homes and NHS
- Club fire highlights problems in Romanian Healthcare System
- Travel Guide to Romania
- Romanian Festivals and Traditions
- History of Hungary Part 1 - Medieval Period
- Famous Historical Polish People
- A Brief History of Lithuania
- Estonia - Small but Beautiful
- A Tourist's Guide to Romania
- History of Poland Part 3 - Modern Day
- History of Poland Part 2 - World Wars 1 and 2
- History of Poland Part 1 - Medieval Age
- Healthcare Ails as Doctors, Nurses Emigrate
- Traditional Drinks of Eastern Europe
- Hungary's Natural Thermal Spas
- The History and Difference Between Samba and Salsa
- Name Day - Traditional Polish Custom
- A Tourist's Guide to Latvia
- Placek Swiateczny - Polish Christmas Bread
- The Inca Trail in Peru
- A Brief History of the United Kingdom
- Mexican Dishes and their importance in Traditional Culture
- Cultural Sites of Interest in Poland
- Polish Weddings - Traditional Customs
- Back Packers Guide to Eastern Europe
- How to Manage your Debts during a Recession
- Czech Republic - A Bohemian Paradise
- Romania and the Myth and Origins of Dracula
- Bulgaria-Land of Outstanding Beauty
- Credit Crunch- Has the Capitalism Bubble Burst?
- A Tourist Guide to the Amazon in Brazil
- 20 credit crunch busting tips
- Argentina and Brazil: Rivals in Life and in Sport
- Hungary- Land of Dental Tourism
- London- Playground for the New Russian Elite
- Poland, Family, and Catholic Culture
- Once Golden, Again Golden Poland
- British people of Brazilian descent
- Go Green and Beat the Energy Crunch
- History of Brazilian Samba
- Polish Employee Rights - Anna's Case Study
- Employee Rights -Holidays and Wages
- Cosmetic Surgery in Eastern Europe
- Porkolt- Hungarian Stew
- Review of Polish Festival In London
- Writing Within the Periphery of Culture;
- Different Cheeses from Romania, Poland, Hungary
- Blend in Like a Local in Peru
- Argentinian Bocaditos -finger sandwiches
- Feijoada, Brazilian National Dish
- Basic Polish for Beginners - Part 3
- Fashion Saving Tips- Affordable Panache
- Scottish Traditional Dish - Haggis
- Bliny -Russian Pancakes
- Bigos -Polish Hunter's Stew
- Interview with Writer of Life of a Recluse
- Polish Words for English Speakers - Part 2
- The Rainbow Poem
- Polish Words for English Speakers - Part 1


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